Comprehensive and Progressive Trans Pacific Partnership

Pop Open the Sparkling Wine: Round 2 for TPP

Negotiations started in March 2010.  The original deal was finished in January 2016 with 12 parties.  When the United States withdrew a year later, many people expected the agreement to die a quiet death. However, officials persevered and fought hard to maintain the high quality of the trading arrangements.  For many, this meant accepting tough provisions originally negotiated as part of a comprehensive package with 12 members. The consequences of the final agreement are important for companies.  Our brand-new booklet on 10 Benefits of the CPTPP can be downloaded here.  The final agreement signed in Chile pared back the commitments by suspending 19 elements, amending one provision, and clarifying the terms for two others.  (For more specific details, see our revised Policy Brief 17-11a.)

The Final CPTPP Text is Out

The final version of the TPP was released this morning.  After more than a year of renegotiation, the release seems like a bit of an anticlimax—the whole “text” is 9 pages. This does understate the issue, of course, since the entire original agreement is now incorporated by reference. The eleven country members are meeting in Chile on March 8 for signature.  TPP11 is now on track to begin later this year.  Firms should no longer delay.  The benefits on offer are substantial.  See our latest booklet on how to prepare. For regular readers of Talking Trade, I’m delighted to report that you already knew what the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) contains. 

TPP11 Negotiations Concluded: Time for Business to Get Ready

The 11 members of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) wrapped up the final negotiations on the trade agreement this week in Tokyo.  The TPP11 or Comprehensive and Progressive TPP (CPTPP) is set for formal signature on March 8 in Chile. Most businesses will not be prepared. Many firms expected the agreement to fade away.  Hence, few have made contingency plans for implementation.  Now, the clock is ticking before the agreement takes effect starting in late 2018 or early 2019. Nearly all of TPP11 begins on the very first day (entry into force or EIF), including all market opening for services, investment, most changes in customs procedures, the majority of tariff cuts and more. Most of TPP11 is identical to what was negotiated originally.  The majority of the deal remains intact. 

TPP11 and RCEP Compared: A Side-by-Side Update

November 2017:  This is an updated version of an earlier post on Talking Trade, modified to reflect the TPP11 changes and the expansion of the agenda in RCEP.  However, because RCEP, especially, remains under negotiation, the assessment should be viewed with some caution.  For further discussion on how you can use or influence these agreements, please see us soon at the Asian Trade Centre.

CPTPP Or TPP11 For Trade Nerds

Broken down, the new elements are the inclusion of the suspended bits (discussed more below), the revised entry into force (necessary after the US pulled out), a new section on withdrawal (the necessity of which was made crystal clear after the US pulled out), a new section on accession (since the old one was too vague anyway), a potentially interesting article 6 that seems to review the whole agreement in the future, and article 7 that copies across all of the original commitments and texts from TPP12.  What this means in practice is that the CPTPP or TPP11 has identical schedules and commitments for members to TPP12.  Everyone should start pulling out their TPP12 materials and reviewing documents to refresh memories now.  Firms need to prepare for entry into force which is coming up fast.